The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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362               THE STORY OF PRINCE AHMED
Ahmed. ' My Princess,' said he, ' as I do not remember I ever did or designed anybody an injury, I cannot believe anybody can have a thought of doing me one, but if they have I shall not, neverthe­less, forbear doing good whenever I have an opportunity.' Then he went back to his father's palace.
In the meantime the two women carried the magician into a very fine apartment, richly furnished. First they sat her down upon a sofa, with her back supported with a cushion of gold brocade, while they made a bed on the same sofa before her, the quilt of which was finely embroidered with silk, the sheets of the finest linen, and the coverlet cloth-of-gold. When they had put her into bed (for the old sorceress pretended that her fever was so violent she could not help herself in the least) one of the women went out, and returned soon again with a china dish in her hand, full of a certain liquor, which she presented to the magician, while the other helped her to sit up. ' Drink this liquor,' said she; ' it is the Water of the Fountain of Lions, and a sovereign remedy against all fevers whatsoever. You will find the effect of it in less than an hour's time.'
The magician, to dissemble the better, took it after a great deal of entreaty; but at last she took the china dish, and, holding back her head, swallowed down the liquor. When she was laid down again the two women covered her up. 'Lie quiet,' said she who brought her the china cup,' and get a little sleep if you can. We'll leave you, and hope to find you perfectly cured when we come again an hour hence.'
The two women came again at the time they said they should, and found the magician got up and dressed, and sitting upon the sofa. ' O admirable potion !' she said:' it has wrought its cure much sooner than you told me it would, and I shall be able to prosecute my journey.'
The two women, who were fairies as well as their mistress, after they had told the magician how glad they were that she was cured so soon, walked before her, and conducted her through several apartments, all more noble than that wherein she lay, into a large hall, the most richly and magnificently furnished of all the palace.
Paribanou was sat in this hall on a throne of massive gold, enriched with diamonds, rubies, and pearls of an extraordinary size, and attended on each hand by a great number of beautiful fairies, all richly clothed. At the sight of so much majesty, the magician was not only dazzled, but was so amazed that, after she had pro-
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