The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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374                        THE HISTORY OF JACK
THE HISTORY OF JACK THE GIANT-KILLER
I N the reign of the famous King Arthur there lived in Cornwall a lad named Jack vho was a boy of a bold temper, and took delight in hearing or reading of conjurers, giants, and fairies and used to listen eagerly to the deeds of the knights of King Arthur's Round Table
In those days there lived on St. Michael's Mount, off Cornwall, a huge giant, eighteen feet high and nine feet round ; his fierce and savage looks were the terror of all who beheld him
He dwelt in a gloomy cavern on the top of the mountain and used to wade over to the mainland in search of prey; when he would throw half-a-dozen oxen upon his back and tie three times as many sheep and hogs round his waist, and march back to his own abode.                                                     
The giant had done this for many years when Jack resolved to destroy him.
Jack took a horn, a shovel, a pickaxe, his armour, and a dark lantern, and one winter's evening he went to the mount. There he dug a pit twenty-two feet deep and twenty broad. He covered the top over so as to make it look like solid ground. He then blew such a tantivy that the giant awoke jand came out of his den, crying out: You saucy villain! you shall pay for this. I'll broil you for my breakfast!'
He had just finished, when, taking one step further, he tumbled headlong into the pit, and Jack struck him a blow on the head with his pickaxe which killed him. Jack then returned home to cheer his friends with the news.
Another giant, called Blunderbore, vowed to be revenged on Jack if ever he should have him in his power. This giant kept an enchanted castle in the midst of a lonely wood; and some time after the death of Cormoran Jack was passing through a wood, and being weary sat down and went to sleep.
The giant, passing by and seeing Jack, carried him to his castle,
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