The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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382             THE BLACK BULL OF NORROWAY
and ugsome glen, where they stopped, and the lady lighted down. Says the bull to her: ' Here ye maun stay till I gang and fight the deil. Ye maun seat yoursel' on that stane, and move neither hand nor fit till I come back, else I'll never find ye again. And if every­thing round about ye turns blue I hae beaten the deil; but should a' things turn red he'll hae conquered me.' She set hersel' down on the stane, and by-and-by a' round her turned blue. O'ercomo wi' joy, she lifted the ae fit and crossed it owre the ither, sae glad was she that her companion was victorious. The bull returned and sought for but never could find her.
Lang she sat, and aye she grat, till she wearied. At last she rase and gaed awa', she kendna whaur till. On she wandered till she came to a great hill o' glass, that she tried a' she could to climb, but wasna able. Bound the bottom o' the hill she gaed, sabbing and seeking a passage owre, till at last she came to a smith's house; and the smith promised, if she wad serve him seven years, he wad make her iron shoon, wherewi' she could climb owre the glassy hill. At seven years' end she got her iron shoon, clamb the glassy hill, and chanced to come to the au!d washerwife's habitation. There
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