The BROWN FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

A Collection of Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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216              THE SISTER OF THE SUN
it was his—and on this occasion he was perfectly right; but, as they could not decide the matter, they went straight to the king.
When the king had heard the story, he decided that the feather belonged to his son ; but the other boy would not listen to this and claimed the feather for himself. At length the king's patience gave way, and he said angrily:
' Very well; if you are so sure that the feather is yours, yours it shall be; only you will have to seek till you find a golden hen with a feather missing from her tail. And if you fail to find her your head will be the forfeit.'
The boy had need of all his courage to listen silently to the king's words. He had no idea where the golden hen might be, or even, if he discovered that, how he was to get to her. But there was nothing for it but to do the king's bidding, and he felt that the sooner he left the palace the better. So he went home and put some food into a bag, and then set forth, hoping that some accident might show him which path to take.
After walking for several hours he met a fox, who seemed inclined to be friendly, and the boy was so glad to have anyone to talk to that he sat down and entered into conversation.
' Where are you going ?' asked the fox.
' I have got to find a golden hen who has lost a feather out of her tail,' answered the boy; ' but I don't know where she lives or how I shall catch her! '
' Oh, I can show you the way ! ' said the fox, who was really very good-natured. ' Far towards the east, in that direction, lives a beautiful maiden who is called " The Sister of the Sun." She has three golden hens in her house. Perhaps the feather belongs to one of them.'
The boy was delighted at this news, and they walked on all day together, the fox in front, and the boy behind. When evening came they lay down to sleep, and put the knapsack under their heads for a pillow.
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