The Crimson Fairy Book - online children's book

A Classic fairy tale collection for children by Andrew Lang

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'Well, now you have been near a hundred deaths; will you say: "To your good health"?'
But the shepherd only gave the same answer:
'I won't say it till the princess is my wife.'
'Perhaps after all you may do it for less,' said the king, who saw that there was no chance of making away with the shepherd; and he ordered the state coach to be got ready, then he made the shepherd get in with him and sit beside him, and ordered the coachman to drive to the silver wood. When they reached it he said: 'Do you see this silver wood? Well, if you will say, "To your good health," I will give it to you.'
The shepherd turned hot and cold by turns, but he still persisted:
'I will not say it till the princess is my wife.'
The king was much vexed; he drove further on till they came to a splendid castle, all of gold, and then he said:
'Do you see this golden castle? Well, I will give you that too, the silver wood and the golden castle, if only you will say that one thing to me: "To your good health."'
The shepherd gaped and wondered and was quite dazzled, but he still said:
'No; I will not say it till I have the princess for my wife.'
This time the king was overwhelmed with grief, and gave orders to drive on to the diamond pond, and there he tried once more.
'Do you see this diamond pond? I will give you that too, the silver wood and the golden castle and the diamond pond. You shall have them all--all--if you will but say: "To your good health!"'
The shepherd had to shut his staring eyes tight not to be dazzled with the brilliant pond, but still he said:
'No, no; I will not say it till I have the princess for my wife.'
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