The Crimson Fairy Book - online children's book

A Classic fairy tale collection for children by Andrew Lang

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Then the king saw that all his efforts were useless, and that he might as well give in, so he said:
'Well, well, it's all the same to me--I will give you my daughter to wife; but, then, you really and truly must say to me: "To your good health."'
'Of course I'll say it; why should I not say it? It stands to reason that I shall say it then.'
At this the king was more delighted than anyone could have believed. He made it known all through the country that there were to be great rejoicings, as the princess was going to be married. And everyone rejoiced to think that the princess, who had refused so many royal suitors, should have ended by falling in love with the staring-eyed shepherd.
There was such a wedding as had never been seen. Everyone ate and drank and danced. Even the sick were feasted, and quite tiny new-born children had presents given them.
But the greatest merry-making was in the king's palace; there the best bands played and the best food was cooked; a crowd of people sat down to table, and all was fun and merry-making.
And when the groomsman, according to custom, brought in the great boar's head on a big dish and placed it before the king so that he might carve it and give everyone a share, the savoury smell was so strong that the king began to sneeze with all his might.
'To your very good health,' cried the shepherd before anyone else, and the king was so delighted that he did not regret having given him his daughter.
In time, when the old king died, the shepherd succeeded him. He made a very good king and never expected his people to wish him well against their wills; but, all the same, everyone did wish him well, for they all loved him.
[From Russische Mahrchen.]
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