The Crimson Fairy Book - online children's book

A Classic fairy tale collection for children by Andrew Lang

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'I am making a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. James, for before I was born my mother vowed that I should go forth with a thank offering on my eighteenth birthday.'
'That is my case too,' said the stranger, 'and, as we must both travel in the same direction, let us bear each other company.'
The young man agreed to this proposal, but he took care not to get on terms of familiarity with the new comer until he had tried him with the apple.
By-and-by they reached an inn, and at sight of it the king's son said, 'I am very hungry. Let us enter and order something to eat.' The other consented, and they were soon sitting before a good dinner.
When they had finished the king's son drew an apple from his pocket, and cut it into a big half and a little half, and offered both to the stranger, who took the biggest bit. 'You are no friend of mine,' thought the king's son, and in order to part company with him he pretended to be ill and declared himself unable to proceed on his journey.
'Well, I can't wait for you,' replied the other; 'I am in haste to push on, so farewell.'
'Farewell,' said the king's son, glad in his heart to get rid of him so easily. The king's son remained in the inn for some time, so as to let the young man have a good start; them he ordered his horse and rode after him. But he was very sociable and the way seemed long and dull by himself. 'Oh, if I could only meet with a true friend,' he thought, 'so that I should have some one to speak to. I hate being alone.'
Soon after he came up with a young man, who stopped and asked him, 'Where are you going, my fine fellow?' The king's son explained the object of his journey, and the young man answered, as the other had done, that he also was fulfilling the vow of his mother made at his birth.
'Well, we can ride on together,' said the king's son, and the road seemed much shorter now that he had some one to talk to.
At length they reached an inn, and the king's son exclaimed, 'I am very hungry; let us go in and get something to eat.'
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