The GREEN Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

THE CRYSTAL COFFIN.
293
by whom I was carefully educated. We loved each other so tenderly and our tastes and interests were so much alike that we determined never to marry, but to spend our entire lives together.
"There was no lack of society at our home. Friends and neighbors paid us frequent visits, and we kept open house for all. Thus it happened that one evening a stranger rode up to the castle and asked for hospitality, as he could not reach the nearest town that night. We granted his ; request with ready courtesy, and during supper he entertained us with most agreeable conversation, mingled ^ with amusing anecdotes. My brother took such a fancy to him that he pressed him to spend a couple of days with us, which, after a little hesitation, the stranger consented to do. We rose late from table, and while my brother was showing our guest to his room I hurried to mine, for I was very tired and longed to get to bed. I had hardly dropped off to sleep when I was roused by the sound of some soft and charming music. Wondering whence it could come, I was about to call to my maid who slept in the room next mine, when, to my surprise, I felt as if some heavy weight on my chest had taken all power from me, and I lay there unable to utter the slightest sound.
"Meantime, by the light of the night lamp, I saw the stranger enter my room, though the double doors had been securely locked. He drew near and told me that through the power of his magic arts he had caused the soft music to waken me, and had made his way through bolts and bars to offer me his hand and heart. My re­pugnance to his magic was so great that I would not con­descend to give any answer. He waited motionless for some time, hoping no doubt for a favorable reply, but as I continued silent he angrily declared that he would find means to punish my pride, and therewith he left the room in a rage.
"I spent the night in the greatest agitation, and only fell into a doze toward morning. As soon as I awoke I jumped up and hurried to tell my brother all that had happened, but he had left his room, and his servant told me that he had gone out at daybreak to hunt with the stranger.
"My mind misgave me. I dressed in all haste, had my palfrey saddled, and rode off at full gallop toward the
Previous Contents Next