THE ORANGE FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

A Collection of Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

36 HOW ISURO THE RABBIT TRICKED GUDU
'Those are the thieves.' And at the sound of his voice the big Gudu trembled ah over.
'How dare you say such things? I defy you to prove it,' answered Isuro boldly. And he danced forward, and turned head over heels, and shook himself before them all.
'I spoke hastily; you are innocent,' said the old man; 'but now let the baboon do likewise.' And when Gudu began to jump the goat's bones rattled, and the people cried: 'It is Gudu who is the goat-slayer!' But Gudu answered:
'Nay, I did not kill your goat; it was Isuro, and he ate the meat, and hung the bones round my neck. So it is he who should die!' And the people looked at each other, for they knew not what to believe. At length one man said:
' Let them both die, but they may choose their own deaths.'
Then Isuro answered:
'If we must die, put us in the place where the wood is cut, and heap it up all round us, so that we cannot escape, and set fire to the wood; and if one is burned and the other is not, then he that is burned is the goat-slayer.'
And the people did as Isuro had said. But Isuro knew of a hole under the wood-pile, and when the fire was kindled he ran into the hole, but Gudu died there.
When the fire had burned itself out, and only ashes were left where the wood had been, Isuro came out of his hole, and said to the people:
'Lo! did I not speak well? He who killed your goat is among those ashes.'
(Mashono Stor,.)
Previous Contents Next