THE ORANGE FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

A Collection of Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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168 ADVENTURES OF JACKAL'S ELDEST SON
was spread upon the red earth, the hyena and the jackal standing on each side of it.
There was silence for a few moments, and then the lion sat up, looking very great and wise.
'My judgment is that the garment shall belong wholly to whoever first rings the bell of the nearest mosque at dawn to-morrow. Now go; for much business awaits me!'
All that night the hyena sat up, fearing lest the jackal should reach the bell before him, for the mosque was close at hand. With the first streak of dawn he bounded away to the bell, just as the jackal, who had slept soundly all night, was rising to his feet.
'Good luck to you,' cried the jackal. And throwing the cloak over his back he darted away across the plain, and was seen no more by his friend the hyena.
After running several miles the jackal thought he was safe from pursuit, and seeing a lion and another hyena talking together, he strolled up to join them.
'Good morning,' he said; 'may I ask what is the mat­ter? You seem very serious about something.'
'Pray sit down,' answered the lion. 'We were wonder­ing in which direction we should go to find the best dinner. The hyena wishes to go to the forest, and I to the moun­tains. What do you say?'
'Well, as I was sauntering over the plain, just now, I noticed a flock of sheep grazing, and some of them had wandered into a little valley quite out of sight of the shepherd. If you keep among the rocks you will never be observed. But perhaps you will allow me to go with you and show you the way?'
'You are really very kind,' answered the lion. And they crept stealthily along till at length they reached the mouth of the valley where a ram, a sheep and a lamb were feeding on the rich grass, unconscious of their danger.
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