THE ORANGE FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

A Collection of Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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332
ANDRAS BAIVE
and by-and-by give a great spring, which landed him in the midst of the stream. But, instead of sinking to the bottom, he paused to steady himself, then gave a second spring which landed him on the further shore. He next ran on to a little hill where he sat down and began to neigh loudly, so that the Stalo might know exactly where he was.
'Ah! there you are,' cried the Stalo, appearing on the opposite bank; 'for a moment I really thought I had lost you.'
'No such luck,' answered Andras, shaking his head sorrowfully. By this time he had taken his own shape again.
'Well, but I don't see how I am to get to you!' said the Stalo, looking up and down.
'Jump over, as I did,' answered Andras; 'it is quite easy.'
'But I could not jump this river; and I don't know how you did,' replied the Stalo.
'I should be ashamed to say such things,' exclaimed Andras. ' Do you mean to tell me that a jump, which the weakest Lapp boy would make nothing of, is beyond your strength ?'
The Stalo grew red and angry when he heard these words, just as Andras meant him to do. He bounded into the air and fell straight into the river. Not that that would have mattered, for he was a good swimmer; but Andras drew out the bow and arrows which every Lapp carries, and took aim at him. His aim was good, but the Stalo sprang so high into the air that the arrow flew between his feet. A second shot, directed at his forehead, fared no better, for this time the Stalo jumped so high to the other side that the arrow passed between his finger and thumb. Then Andras aimed his third arrow a little over the Stalo's head, and when he
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