THE ORANGE FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

A Collection of Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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334                         ANDRAS BAIVE
the fiord, and take whatever you find in my house which belongs to me. My dog you must kill, but spare my son, Andras.'
Then he died; and Andras sailed in his boat away across the fiord and found the dog and boy. The dog, a fierce, wicked-looking creature, he slew with one blow from his fist, for it is well-known that if a Stalo's dog licks the blood that flows from his dead master's wounds the Stalo comes to life again. That is why no real Stalo is ever seen without his dog; but the bailiff, being only half a Stalo, had forgotten his, when he went to the little lakes in search of Andras. Next, Andras put all the gold and jewels which he found in the boat into his pockets, and bidding the boy get in, pushed it off from the shore, leaving the little craft to drift as it would, while he himself ran home. With the treasures he possessed he was able to buy a great herd of reindeer; and he soon married a rich wife, whose parents would not have him as a son-in-law when he was poor, and the two lived happy for ever after.
(From Lappldndische Mahrchen, J. C. Poestion.)
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