The PINK FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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120              HANS, THE MERMAID'S SON
of him in some way or other. The steward said that he would manage this all right. Next morning they were to clean the well, and they would make use of that oppor­tunity. They would get him down into the well, and then have a big mill-stone ready to throw down on top of him — that would settle him. After that they could just fill in the well, and then escape being at any expense for his funeral. Both the squire and his wife thought this a splendid idea, and went about rejoicing at the thought that now they would get rid of Hans.
But Hans was hard to kill, as we shall see. He slept long next morning, as he always did, and finally, as he would not waken by himself, the squire had to go and call him. ' Get up, Hans, you are sleeping too long,' he cried. Hans woke up and rubbed his eyes. ' That's so,' said he, 'I shall rise and have my breakfast.' He got up then and dressed himself, while the breakfast stood wait­ing for him. When he had finished the whole of this, he asked what he was to do that day. He was told to help the other men to clean out the well. That was all right, and he went out and found the other men waiting for him. To these he said that they could choose whichever task they liked — either to go down into the well and fill the buckets while he pulled them up, or pull them up, and he alone would go down to the bottom of the well. They answered that they would rather stay above-ground, as there would be no room for so many of them down in the well.
Hans therefore went down alone, and began to clean out the well, but the men had arranged how they were to act, and immediately each of them seized a stone from a heap of huge blocks, that lay in the farmyard just as big as they could lift, and threw them down above him, thinking to kill him with these. Hans, however, gave no more heed to this than to shout up to them, to keep the hens away from the well, for they were scraping gravel down on the top of him.
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