The PINK FAIRY BOOK - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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254                  THE TROLL'S DAUGHTER
' Perhaps you will serve me for another year yet,' said the troll, ' and you will get six bushels of money for it; that makes twelve in all, and that is a pretty penny.'
' No,' said the youth; he thought he had done enough, and was anxious to go to some other place to serve, and learn other people's ways; but he would, perhaps, come back to the troll some other time.
The troll said that he would always be welcome; he had served him faithfully for the three years they had agreed upon, and he could make no objections to his leaving now.
The youth then got his six bushels of money, and with these he betook himself straight to the kingdom which his sweetheart had told him of. He got his money buried in a lonely spot close to the king's palace, and then went in there and asked to be taken into service. He obtained his request, and was taken on as stableman, to tend the king's horses.
Some time passed, and he noticed how the king always went about sorrowing and grieving, and was never glad or happy. One day the king came into the stable, where there was no one present except the youth, who said straight out to him that, with his majesty's per­mission, he wished to ask him why he was so sorrowful.
'It's of no use speaking about that,' said the king; ' you cannot help me, at any rate.'
' You don't know about that,' said the youth ; ' I know well enough what it is that lies so heavy on your mind, and I know also of a plan to get the money paid.'
This was quite another case, and the king had more talk with the stableman, who said that he could easily lend the king the six bushels of money, but would only do it on condition that he should be allowed to accom­pany the king when he went to pay the debt, and that he should then be dressed like the king's court fool, and run before him. He would cause some trouble, for which the
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