The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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66 THE BLACK THIEF AND KNIGHT OF THE GLEN
They all returned thanks on their knees, and the Black Thief told him the reason they attempted to steal the Steed of Bells, and the necessity they were under in going home.
' Well,' says the Knight of the Glen, ' if that's the case I bestow you my steed rather than this brave fellow should die; so you may go when you please, only remember to call and see me betimes, that we may know each other well.'
They promised they would, and with great joy they set off for the King their father's palace, and the Black Thief along with them.
The wicked Queen was standing all this time on the tower, and, hearing the bells ringing at a great distance off, knew very well it was the princes coming home, and the steed with them, and through spite and vexation precipitated herself from the tower and was shattered to pieces.
The three princes lived happy and well during their father's reign, and always keeping the Black Thief along with them; but how they did after the old King's death is not known.1
1 The Hibernian Tales.
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