The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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100                            PEINCESS ROSETTE
At first the King of the Peacocks was taken aback by this bold speech, and had half a mind to send them all away together; but his Prime Minister declared that it would never do to let such a trick as that pass unpunished, everybody would laugh at him; so the accusation was drawn up against them, that they were impostors, and that they had promised the King a beautiful Princess in marriage who, when she arrived, proved to be an ugly peasant girl.
This accusation was read to the prisoners, who cried out that they had spoken the truth, that their sister was indeed a Princess more beautiful than the day, and that there was some mystery about all this which they could not fathom. Therefore they de­manded seven days in which to prove their innocence, The King of the Peacocks was so angry that he would hardly even grant them this favour, but at last he was persuaded to do so.
While all this was going on at court, let us see what had been happening to the real Princess. When the day broke she and Frisk were equally astonished at finding themselves alone upon the sea, with no boat and no one to help them. The Princess cried and cried, until even the fishes were sorry for her.
' Alas!' she said, ' the King of the Peacocks must have ordered me to be thrown into the sea because he had changed his mind and did not want to many me. But how strange of him. when I should have loved him so much, and we should have been so happy together!'
And then she cried harder than ever, for she could not help still loving him. So for two days they floated up and down the sea, wet and shivering with the cold, and so hungry that when the Princess saw some oysters she caught them, and she and Frisk both ate some, though they didn't like them at all. When night came the Prin­cess was so frightened that she said to Frisk:
' Oh! Do please keep on barking for fear the soles should come and eat us up 1'
Now it happened that they had floated close in to the shore, where a poor old man lived all alone in a little cottage. When he heard Frisk's barking he thought to himself:
' There must have been a shipwreck !' (for no dogs ever passed that way by any chance), and he went out to see if he could be of any use. He soon saw the Princess and Frisk floating up and down, and llosette, stretching out her hands to him, cried :
' Oh ! Good old man, do save me, or I shall die of cold and hunger! '
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