The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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sented, even down to the moment when Percinet found her in the forest.
' Your painters must indeed be diligent,' she said, pointing out the last picture to the Prince.
' They are obliged to be, for I will not have anything forgotten that happens to you,' he answered.
When the Princess grew sleepy, twenty-four charming maidens put her to bed in the prettiest room she had ever seen, and then sang to her so sweetly that Graciosa's dreams were all of mermaids,
and cool sea waves, and caverns, in which she wandered with Percinet; but when she woke up again her first thought was that, delightful as this fairy palace seemed to her, yet she could not stay in it, but must go back to her father. When she had been dressed by the four-and-twenty maidens in a charming robe which the Queen had sent for her, and in which she looked prettier than ever, Prince Percinet came to see her, and was bitterly disappointed when she told him what she had been thinking. He begged her to con­sider again how unhappy the wicked Queen would make her, and
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