The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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At first she would not do it, but when the Bull said that this was the only reward that he would have for what he had done for her, she could do no otherwise. So though she thought it very cruel, she slaved on and cut at the great animal with the knife till she had cut off his head and hide, and then she folded up the hide and laid it beneath the mountain wall, and put the copper leaf, and the silver leaf, and the golden apple inside it.
When she had done that she went away to the pig-sty, but all the way as she went she wept, and was very sorrowful. Then she put on the wooden gown, and walked to the King's palace. When she got there she went into the kitchen and begged for a place, saying that her name was Kari Woodengown.
The cook told her that she might have a place and leave to stay there at once and wash up, for the girl who had done that before had just gone away. 'And as soon as you get tired of being here you will take your­self off too,' said he.
' No,' said she, ' that I shall certainly not.'
And then she washed up, and did it very tidily. On Sunday some strangers were coming to the King's palace, so Kari begged to have leave to carry up the water for the Prince's bath, but the others laughed at her and said, ' What do you want there ? Do you think the Prince will ever look at such a fright as you? '
She would not give it up, however, but went on begging until at last she got leave. When she was going upstairs her wooden gown
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