The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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one is coming.' But to climb up there seemed impossible. Never­theless she presently hit upon a plan. The great clock was in the turret, as she knew, though the weights hung down into the gallery. Taking one of them off the rope, she tied herself on in its place, and when the clock was wound, up she went triumphantly into the turret. She looked out over the country the first thing, but seeing nothing she sat down to rest a little, and accidentally leant back against the wall which Curlicue, or rather Prince Peerless, had so hastily mended. Out fell the broken stone, and with it the golden key. The clatter it made upon the floor attracted the Princess Cabbage-Stalk's attention.
She picked it up, and after a moment's consideration decided that it must belong to the curious old cabinet in the corner, which had no visible keyhole. And then it was not long before she had it open, and was admiring the treasures it contained as much as Prince Peerless had done before her, and at last she came to the carbuncle box. No sooner had she opened it than with a shudder of horror she tried to throw it down, but found that some mysterious power compelled her to hold it against her will. And at this moment a voice in her ear said softly :
' Take courage, Princess; upon this adventure your future happi­ness depends.'
' What am I to do ? ' said the Princess trembling.
' Take the box,' replied the voice, ' and hide it under your pillow, and when you see an Eagle, give it to him without losing a moment.'
Terrified as the Princess was, she did not hesitate to obej', and hastened to put back all the other precious things precisely as she had found them. By this time her guards were seeking her every­where, and they were amazed to find her up in the turret, for they said she could only have got there by magic. For three days nothing happened, but at last in the night the Princess heard something flutter against her window, and drawing back her curtains she saw-in the moonlight that it was an Eagle.
Limping across at her utmost speed she threw the window open, and the great Eagle sailed in beating with his wings for joy. The Princess lost no time in offering it the carbuncle box, which it grasped in its talons, and instantly disappeared, leaving in its place the most beautiful Prince she had ever seen, who was splendidly dressed, and wore a diamond crown.
' Princess,' said he, ' for two hundred years has a wicked en­chanter kept me here. We both loved the same Fairy, but she pre-
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