The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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She ought to be just as much my Princess as she is yours now, for you are a man of your word,' said the youth.
Yes, yes,' said the King. ' Have her thou shalt, as I have said it; but first of all thou must make the sun shine into my palace here.'
For there was a large and high hill outside the windows which overshadowed the palace so much that the sun could not shine in.
' That was no part of our bargain,' answered the youth. ' But as nothing that I can say will move you, I suppose I shall have to try to do my best, for the Princess I will have.'
So he went down to Dapplegrim again and told him what the King desired, and Dapplegrim thought that it might easily be done; but first of all he must have new shoes, and ten pounds of iron and twelve pounds of steel must go to the making of them, and two smiths were also necessary, one to hammer and one to hold, and then it would be very easy to make the sun shine into the King's palace.
The lad asked for these things and obtained them instantly, for the King thought that for very shame he could not refuse to give them, and so Dapplegrim got new shoes, and they were good ones. The youth seated himself on him, and once more they went their way, and for each hop that Dapplegrim made, down went the hill fifteen ells into the earth, and so they went on until there was no hill left for the King to see.
When the youth came down again to the King's palace he asked the King if the Princess should not at last be his, for now no one could say that the sun was not shining into the palace. But the other people in the palace had again stirred up the King, and he answered that the youth should have her, and that he had never intended that he should not; but first of all he must get her quite as good a horse to ride to the wedding on as that which he had him­self. The youth said that the King had never told him he was to do that, and it seemed to him that he had now really earned the Princess; but the King stuck to what he had said, and if the youth were unable to do it he was to lose his life, the King said. The youth went down to the stable again, and very sad and sorrowful he was, as anyone may well imagine. Then he told Dapplegrim that the King had now recmired that he should get the Princess as good a bridal horse as that which the bridegroom had, or he should lose his life. ' But that will be no easy thing to do,' said he, ' for your equal is not to be found in all the world,'
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