The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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254                                       DAPPLE GRIM
. ' and then you will hear what a voice it has.' So ney travelled on through many more different kinds of country, and then Dapple-grim neighed for the third time; but before he could ask the youth if he heard anything, there was such a neighing on the other side of the heath that the youth thought that hills and rocks would be rent in pieces.
' Now he is here !' said Dapplegrim. ' Be quick, and fling over me the ox-hides that have the spikes in them, throw the twelve tons of tar over the field, and climb up into that great spruce fir tree. When he comes, fire will spurt out of both his nostrils, and then the tar will catch fire. Now mark what I say—if the flame ascends I conquer, and if it sinks I fail; but if you see that I am winning, fling the bridle, which you must take off me, over his head, and then he will become quite gentle.'
Just as the youth had flung all the hides with the spikes over Dapplegrim, and the tar over the field, and had got safely up into the spruce fir, a horse came with flame spouting from his nostrils, and the tar caught fire in a moment; and Dapplegrim and the horse began to fight until the stones leapt up to the sky. They bit, and they fought with their fore legs and their hind legs, and sometimes the youth looked at them, and sometimes he looked at the tar, but at last the flames began to rise, for wheresoever the strange horse bit or wheresoever he kicked he hit upon the spikes in the hides, and at length he had to yield. When the youth saw that, he was not long in getting down from the tree and flinging the bridle over the horse's head, and then he became so tame that he might have been led by a thin string.
This horse was dappled too, and so like Dapplegrim that no one could distinguish the one from the other. The youth seated himself on the dappled horse which he had captured, and rode home again to the King's palace, and Dapplegrim ran loose by his side. When he got there, the King was standing outside in the courtyard.
' Can you tell me which is the horse I have caught, and which is the one I had before? ' said the yoath. ' If you can't, I think your daughter is mine.'
The King went and looked at both the dappled horses; he looked high and he looked low, he looked before mi id he looked behind, but there was not a hair's difference between the two.
' No,' said the King; ' that I cannot tell thee, and as thou hast procured such a splendid bridal horse for my daughter thou shalt
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