The RED Fairy Book - online children's book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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' Let him come in,' said the Troll.
When Minnikin came, the Troll asked if it were true that he could brew a hundred lasts of malt at one brewing.
' Yes,' said Minnikin, ' it is.'
' It is well then that I have lighted on thee,' said the Troll. ' Fall to work this very minute, but Heaven help thee if thou dost not brew the ale strong.'
' Oh, it shall taste well,' said Minnikin, and at once set himself to work to brew.
' But I must have more trolls to help to carry what is wanted,' said Minnikin; ' these that I have are good for nothing.'
So he got more and so many that there was a swarm of them, and then the brewing went on. When the sweet-wort was ready they were all, as a matter of course, anxious to taste it, first the Troll himself and then the others; but Minnikin had brewed the wort so strong that they all fell down dead like so many flies as soon as they had drunk any of it. At last there was no one left but one wretched old hag who was lying behind the stove.
' Oh, poor old creature ! ' said Minnikin, ' you shall have a taste of the wort too like the rest.' So he went away and scooped up a little from the bottom of the brewing vat in a milk pan, and gave it to her, and then he was quit of the whole of them.
While Minnikin was now standing there looking about him, he cast his eye on a large chest. This he took and filled it with gold and silver, and then he tied the cable round himself and the Princess and the chest, and tugged at the rope with all his might, whereupon his men drew them up safe and sound.
As soon as Minnikin had got safely on his ship again, he said : ' Now go over salt water and fresh water, over hill and dale, and do not stop until thou comest unto the King's palace.' And in a moment the ship went off so fast that the yellow foam rose up all round about it.
When those who were in the King's palace saw the ship, they lost no time in going to meet him with song and music, and thus they marched up towards Minnikin with great rejoicings; but the gladdest of all was the King, for now he had got his other daughter back again.
But now Minnikin was not happy, for both the Princesses wanted to have him, and he wanted to have none other than the one whom he had first saved, and she was the younger. For this cause he was continually walking backwards and forwards, thinking
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