The VIOLET FAIRY BOOK - full online book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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126
THE TWO FROGS
' What a pity we are not bigger,' said the Osaka frog; ' for then we could see both towns from here, and tell if it is worth our while going on.'
' Oh, that is easily managed,' returned the Kioto frog. ' We have only got to stand up on our hind legs, and hold on to each other, and then we can each look at the town he is travelling to.'
This idea pleased the Osaka frog so much that he at once jumped up and put his front paws on the shoulders of his friend, who had risen also. There they both stood, stretching themselves as high as they could, and holding each other tightly, so that they might not fall down. The Kioto frog turned his nose towards Osaka, and the Osaka frog turned his nose towards Kioto ; but the foolish things forgot that when they stood up their great eyes lay in the backs of their heads, and that though their noses might point to the places to which they wanted to go their eyes beheld the places from which they had come.
' Dear me! ' cried the Osaka frog, ' Kioto is exactly like Osaka. It is certainly not worth such a long journey. I shall go home! '
' If I had had any idea that Osaka was only a copy of Kioto I should never have travelled all this way,' ex­claimed the frog from Kioto, and as he spoke he took his hands from his friend's shoulders, and they both fell down on the grass. Then they took a polite farewell of each other, and set off for home again, and to the end of their lives they believed that Osaka and Kioto, which are as different to look at as two towns can be, were as like as two peas.
[Japanische Marchen.]
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