The VIOLET FAIRY BOOK - full online book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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134          THE STORY OF A GAZELLE
then he said to his attendants, ' That gazelle comes from gentle hands, from the house of a sultan, and that is what makes it so different from other gazelles.' And in the eyes of the sultan the gazelle became a person of consequence.
Meanwhile the gazelle ran on till it came to the place where its master was seated, and his heart laughed when he saw the gazelle.
And the gazelle said to him, ' Get up, my master, and bathe in the stream ! ' and when the man had bathed it said again, ' Now rub yourself well with earth, and rub your teeth well with sand to make them bright and shining.' And when this was done it said, ' The sun has gone down behind the hills; it is time for us to go': so it went and brought the clothes from the back of the horse, and the man put them on and was well pleased.
' Master!' said the gazelle when the man was ready, ' be sure that where we are going you keep silence, except for giving greetings and asking for news. Leave all the talking to me. I have provided you with a wife, and have made her presents of clothes and turbans and rare and precious things, so it is needless for you to speak.'
' Very good, I will be silent,' replied the man as he mounted the horse. 'You have given all this; it is you who are the master, and I who am the slave, and I will obey you in all things.'
' So they went their way, and they went and went till the gazelle saw in the distance the palace of the sultan. Then it said, ' Master, that is the house we are going to, and you are not a poor man any longer: even your name is new.'
' What is my name, eh, my father? ' asked the man.
' Sultan Darai,' said the gazelle.
Very soon some soldiers came to meet them, while others ran off to tell the sultan of their approach.
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