The VIOLET FAIRY BOOK - full online book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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142          THE STORY OF A GAZELLE
those people that are bound. And let some sweep, and some spread the beds, and some cook, and some draw water, and some come out and receive the mistress.'
And when the sultana and her ladies and her slaves entered the house, and saw the rich stuffs it was hung with, and the beautiful rice that was prepared for them to eat, they cried: ' Ah, you gazelle, we have seen great houses, we have seen people, we have heard of things. But this house, and you, such as you are, we have never seen or heard of.'
After a few days, the ladies said they wished to go home again. The gazelle begged them hard to stay, but finding they would not, it brought many gifts, and gave some to the ladies and some to their slaves. And they all thought the gazelle greater a thousand times than its master, Sultan Darai.
The gazelle and its master remained in the house many weeks, and one day it said to the old woman, ' I came with my master to this place, and I have done many things for my master, good things, and till to-day he has never asked me: " Well, my gazelle, how did you get this house? Who is the owner of it? And this town, were there no people in it?" All good things I have done for the master, and he has not one day done me any good thing. But people say, " If you want to do any one good, don't do him good only, do him evil also, and there will be peace between you." So, mother, I have done : I want to see the favours I have done to my master, that he may do me the like.'
' Good,' replied the old woman, and they went to bed.
In the morning, when light came, the gazelle was sick in its stomach and feverish, and its legs ached. And it said ' Mother! '
And she answered, ' Here, my son? '
And it said, ' Go and tell my master upstairs the gazelle is very ill.'
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