GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES - online book

130 Fairy Stories Adapted & Arranged for young people

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$6             THE WONDERFUL FIDDLER.
the trees in misery and pain. " Dear, clever brother wolf," he cried, " do come to my help; the fiddler has betrayed me." At this appeal the wolf stoppedódrew the branches down, untied the string with his teeth, and set the fox free. Then they both started off together, determined on revenge. On their way they discovered the imprisoned hare whom they quickly set free, and then the three started together to find their enemy.
But while all this was going on, the fiddler had attracted another by his music ; the tones of the violin reached the ears of a poor wood-cutter, who was obliged against his will to leave off work, and taking his axe under his arm he went to meet the fiddler.
"At last, here comes the right companion for me," he cried. " It was men I wanted, not wild beasts."
But while he played his sweetest notes to please the poor wood≠cutter, who listened as if bewitched to the sounds, up came the wolf, the fox, and the hare, with their wicked intentions visible in their eyes.
At this the new friend placed himself before the musician, and raising his glittering axe exclaimed, " If you attempt to harm him, take care of yourselves, that's all; you have me to deal with now."
At this the animals in alarm ran back into the wood, and the woodman took the fiddler home to his cottage and remained his friend ever after.
Many years ago lived a king and queen who had twelve sons, all bright, intelligent lads; but they were not quite happy, although they loved each other very much. For one day the king had told his wife that as he had now twelve sons, if a daughter should be born, all the sons would die and their sister alone inherit his king≠dom and riches.
So the king had twelve coffins made in readiness for his sons, in case his next child should be a daughter. These coffins, which contained their grave clothes, were filled with shavings, and locked up in a private room, the key of which the king gave to the queen, praying her not to speak of it to the boys. But this dreadiul