GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES - online book

130 Fairy Stories Adapted & Arranged for young people

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MO UNTAIN SESIMA.                   463
had for a long time been jealous of his brother's fortune, and his happy household, and he could not imagine where he obtained these riches, and what he wanted the bushel for. Then a cunning thought came into his head; he would spread pitch over the bot­tom of the bushel, and when the measure came back, there, sure enough, was a piece of gold sticking to it.
Immediately he went to his brother, and asked him, "What have you been measuring with my bushel?"
"Wheat and barley," said the other. Then he showed him the piece of gold, and threatened him that if he did not tell the truth, he would complain of him to the justices. Then the poor man told his brother all that had occurred.
On this, the rich brother had the horses harnessed to a waggon, and drove away, quite determined to make good use of the op­portunity, and bring away richer treasure than mere gold and silver. When he came to the mountain, he cried, " Mountain Se-sima, Mountain Sesima,—open thyself." The mountain obeyed; and, as he went in, the mountain closed upon him.
There lay the riches all before him, and he, for a long time, was in doubt what first to lay hold of. At last he selected as many precious stones as he could carry, and turned to go out of the mountain with his load.
But his heart and thoughts had been so full of the riches and treasures, that he had forgotten the words, and said, " Mountain Simeli, Mountain Simeli,—open thyself." But that was not the right word, and the mountain did not move itself, but remained closed.
He became terribly frightened; but the longer he thought over the word, the more puzzled he became, and all his treasures now were useless to help him. Evening came, and then the mountain opened, and the twelve robbers came in. They quickly saw him, and laughed as they said, " Have we caged you at last, little bird ? did you think that your visits were not noticed ? The first and second times we could not touch you; but this is the third time, and you shall not escape."
Then he cried out piteously, " It was not me, indeed it was not me, until to-day; it was my brother."
But he might beg for his life, and say what he would, all was useless; they very quickly cut his head off.