GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES - online book

130 Fairy Stories Adapted & Arranged for young people

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THE IRON CHEST,
479
recognized his true bride, and they travelled back, full of joy, to his own kingdom.
The new bride was the daughter of a witch, who, when the young princess had forgotten the order not to speak more than three words, had carried away the iron chest and the prince to her castle, that he might marry her daughter.
But now he was set free, and, as he travelled homewards with his true bride, they came to the wood in which once stood the house with the frogs ; but now they found on its site a noble castle. On entering, instead of the young frogs, a number of princes and princesses advanced to receive them. The spell over them had been broken, and they were full of joy.
At this castle the marriage festival was held, and they wished to reside there, as it was much larger than their father's castle. The old king, however, complained of being left alone, so they returned to him, united the two kingdoms, one to be ruled over by the old king, and another by his son-in-law, whose married life was very happy.
There lived once a little brother and sister, who were very fond of each other. Their own mother was dead, and they had a step­mother who did not love them at all, and tried secretly to injure them.
It happened one day that the two children were playing in a meadow, near the house, with several other children, very happily. Through this meadow ran a stream of water, which passed one side of the house, and on its banks the children were singing,
" Encke Bencke, that's the word, Will you be my little bird ? Birdie a sugar-stick will give, That will I to the good cook give; The cook will give to me some milk ; The milk I will to the tx&cr ral And he will make me a sugar-cake, The cake I then shall give to puss, And she will quicjdy catch a mouse I