Gulliver's Travels Into Several Remote Nations Of The World
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Jonathan Swift's Famous Book, Illustrated By Arthur Rackham

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54              GULLIVER'S TRAVELS
of unwillingness to force the consciences, or destroy the liberties and lives of innocent people.
ARTICLE II
" ' That, whereas certain ambassadors arrived from the court of Blefuscu, to sue for peace in his Majesty's court: he the said Flestrin did, like a false traitor, aid, abet, com­fort, and divert the said ambassadors, although he knew them to be servants to a prince who was lately an open enemy to his Imperial Majesty, and in open war against his said Majesty.
ARTICLE III
" ' That the said Quinbus Flestrin, contrary to the duty of a faithful subject, is now preparing to make a voyage to the court and empire of Blefuscu, for which he hath re­ceived only verbal licence from his Imperial Majesty; and under colour of the said licence doth falsely and traitor­ously intend to take the said voyage, and thereby to aid, comfort, and abet the Emperor of Blefuscu, so late an enemy, and in open war with his Imperial Majesty afore­said.'
" There are some other articles, but these are the most important, of which I have read you an abstract.
" In the several debates upon this impeachment, it must be confessed that his Majesty gave many marks of his great lenity, often urging the services you had done him, and endeavouring to extenuate your crimes. The treasurer and admiral insisted that you should be put to the most painful and ignominious death, by setting fire on your house at night, and the general was to attend with twenty thousand men armed with poisoned arrows, to shoot you on the face and hands. Some of your servants were to have private orders to strew a poisonous juice on your shirts and sheets, which would soon make you tear your own flesh, and die in the utmost torture. The general came
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