Gulliver's Travels Into Several Remote Nations Of The World
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Jonathan Swift's Famous Book, Illustrated By Arthur Rackham

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244
GULLIVER'S TRAVELS
vessels by sea to every part of the world, as well for liquors to drink, as for sauces, and innumerable other conveniences. I assured him, that tins whole globe of earth must be ;it least three times gone round, before one of our better female Yahoos could get her breakfast, or a cup to put it in. He said, thai must needs be a miserable country, which cannot furnish food for its own inhabitant- But what he chiefly wondered at, was how such vast tracts of ground as I de-scribed, sip >uld be wholly without fresh water, and the people put to the necessity of sending over the sea for drink. I replied, thai England (the dear place <>f mv nativity) was computed to produce three times the quantity <»f food, more than its inhabitants are able to consume, as well as liquors extracted from grain, or pressed out of the fruit of certain trees, winch made excellent drink; and the same proportion in every other convenience of life. But in order to feed the luxury and intemperance of the males, and the vanity of the females, we sent away the              I part of our necessary
things to other countries, from whence, m return, we brought the matt rials of diseases, folly, and vice, to spend among ourselves. Hence it follows of necessity, that vast numbers of our people are compelled to seek their livelihood by begging, robbing, stealing, cheating, forswearing, flatter­ing, suborning, forging, gaming, lying, fawning, hectoring, voting, a nbbling, star-gazing, poisoning, canting, libelling, free-thinking, and the like occupations: every one of which terms I was at much pains to make him understand.
That wine was not imported among us from foreign countries, to supply the want of water, or other drinks, but because it was a sort of liquid which made us merry, by putting us out of our senses; diverted all melancholy thoughts, begat wild extravagant imaginations in the brain, raised our hopes, and banished our fears; suspended every office of reason for a time, and deprived us of the use of our limbs till we fell into a profound sleep; although it must be confessed, that we always awaked sick and dispirited;
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