HEIDI, illustrated - complete online book

The Story Of A Young Orphan In Switzerland

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174
HEIDI
it now in the clear morning light; instead of that came these very prosaic and particularly inconvenient com­mands. She could not at once overcome her surprise. She still stood speechless, expecting something further.
But Herr Sesemann had no intention of making fur­ther explanations ; he let the lady stand where she was and went to his daughter's room. As he supposed, the unusual stir in the house had awakened her, and she was listening to everything and wondering what was going on.
Her father sat down by her bed and told her what the ghost really was, and that in the doctor's opinion Heidi was in a very bad condition, and that her nightly wanderings would become more extensive, and perhaps she might climb up to the roof, and that would be very dangerous. So he had decided to send the child home at once, for he could not be responsible for her; and Klara must be reconciled, for she could see that it could not be otherwise.
Klara was very painfully surprised by this news, and at first wanted to find some way out of the difficulty, but it was of no use; her father remained firm in his decision; but he promised to take Klara the following year to Switzerland, if she would be reasonable now and not grieve. So Klara yielded to what could not be helped ; she asked that Heidi's trunk should be brought into her room and packed there, so that she might put in some things Heidi would enjoy; and this her papa willingly granted ; indeed, he even encouraged Klara to give the child a fine outfit.
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