51 Tales translated to English by Lucy Crane & Illustrated by Walter Crane

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THE BROTHER AND SISTER.                       67
gone a long long way, they came at last to a little house, and the maiden looked inside, and as it was empty she thought,
" We might as well live here."
And she fetched leaves and moss to make a soft bed for the fawn, and every morning she went out and gathered roots and berries and nuts for herself, and fresh grass for the fawn, who ate out of her hand with joy, frolicking round her. At night, when the sister was tired, and had said her prayers, she laid her head on the fawn's back, which served her for a pillow, and softly fell asleep. And if only the brother could have got back his own shape again, it would have been a charming life. So they lived a long while in the wilderness alone.
Now it happened that the King of that country held a great hunt in the forest. The blowing of the horns, the barking of the dogs, and the lusty shouts of the huntsmen sounded through the wood, and the fawn heard them and was eager to be among them.
" Oh," said he to his sister, " do let me go to the hunt; I cannot stay behind any longer," and begged so long that at last she consented.
" But mind," said she to him, " come back to me at night. I must lock my door against the wild hunters, so, in order that I may know you, you must knock and say, ' Little sister, let me in,' and unless I hear that I shall not unlock the door."
Then the fawn sprang out, and felt glad and merry in the open air. The King and his huntsmen saw the beautiful animal, and began at once to pursue him, but they could not come within reach of him, for when they thought they were certain of him he sprang away over the bushes and disappeared. As soon as it was dark he went back to the little house, knocked at the door, and said,
" Little sister, let me in."
Then the door was opened to him, and he went in, and rested the whole night long on his soft bed. The next morn­ing the hunt began anew, and when the fawn heard the hunting-horns and the tally-ho of the huntsmen he could rest no longer, and said,
" Little sister, let me out, I must go." The sister opened the door and said,