HOUSEHOLD STORIES from The BROTHERS GRIMM

51 Tales translated to English by Lucy Crane & Illustrated by Walter Crane

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THE ALMOND TREE.
193
" Nay," said the mother, " I feel very low, just as if a great storm were coming."
But Marjory sat weeping; and the bird came flying, and perched on the roof.
" Oh," said the father, " I feel so joyful, and the sun is shining so bright; it is as if I were going to meet with an old friend."
" Nay," said the wife, " I am terrified, my teeth chatter, and there is fire in my veilis," and she tore open her dress to get air; and Marjory sat in a corner and wept, with her plate before her, until it was quite full of tears. Then the bird perched on the almond tree, and sang,
" It was my mother who murdered me ;"
And the mother stopped her ears and hid her eyes, and would neither see nor hear; nevertheless, the noise of a fearful storm was in her ears, and in her eyes a quivering and burning as of lightning.
" It was my father who ate of me ;"
" O mother! " said the father, " there is a beautiful bird singing so finely, and the sun shines, and everything smells as sweet as cinnamon.
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"It was my sister Marjory"
Marjory hid her face in her lap and wept, and the father said,
" I must go out to see the bird."
" Oh do not go I" said the wife, " I feel as if the house were on fire."
But the man went out and looked at the bird.
" Who all my bones in pieces found; Them in a handkerchief she bound, And laid them under the almond tree.            -
,                            Kywitt, kywitt, kywitt, I cry,
Oh what a beautiful bird am I!"
With that the bird let fall the gold chain upon his father's neck, and it fitted him exactly. So he went indoors and said, " Look what a beautiful chain the bird has given me."
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