HOUSEHOLD STORIES from The BROTHERS GRIMM

51 Tales translated to English by Lucy Crane & Illustrated by Walter Crane

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KING THRUSHBEARD.                               209
A few days afterwards came a travelling ballad-singer, and sang under the window in hopes of a small alms. When the king heard of it, he said that he must come in. And so the ballad-singer entered in his dirty tattered garments, and sang before the king and his daughter; when he had done, he asked for a small reward. But the king said,
" Thy song has so well pleased me, that I will give thee my daughter to wife."
The princess was horrified; but the king said,
" I took an oath to give you to the first beggar that came, and so it must be done."
There was no remedy. The priest was fetched, and she had to be married to the ballad-singer out of hand. When all was done, the king said,
" Now, as you are a beggar-wife, you can stay no longer in my castle, so off with you and your husband."
The beggar-man led her away, and she was obliged to go forth with him on foot. On the way they came to a great wood, and she asked,
" Oh, whose is this forest, so thick and so fine? " He answered,
" It is King Thrushbeard's, and might have been thine." And she cried,
11 Oh, I was a silly young thing, I'm afeared, Would I had taken that good King Thrushbeard !"
Then they passed through a meadow, and she asked, " Oh, whose is this meadow, so green and so fine?"
He answered,
" It is King Thrushbeard's, and might have been thine."
And she cried,
" I was a silly young thing, I'm afeared,
Would I had taken that good King Thrushbeard ! "
Then they passed through a great town, and she asked,
'' Whose is this city, so great and so fine ? "
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