Hoyle's Games, Improved And Enlarged - online book

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106
WHIST.
order to win the knave, begin with your king; by which method, your partner may suppose you have queen and ten remaining, especially if you have a second lead, and do not proceed to your queen.
2.  The knave being turned up as before, and you have ace, queen, and ten, by playing your queen, it answers the same purpose as the former rule.
3.  If a queen be turned up on your right hand, and you have ace, king, and knave, by playing your king the purpose is in like manner answered.
4.  Suppose an honour turned up on your left-hand, and you hold none, in that case lead through that honour ; but if you should hold one (except the ace) you must be cautious how you play trumps, because if your partner should hold no honour, your adversary will return your own game upon you.
A CASE TO DEMONSTRATE THE DANGER OF FORCING YOUR PARTNER.
Suppose A and B,partners, and that A has a quint-major in trumps, with a quint-major and three small cards of another suit, and has the lead; and suppose the adversaries C and D to have only five trumps in either hand; in this case, A having the lead, wins every trick.
On the contrary, suppose C has five small trumps, with a quint-major and three small cards of another suit, and that C has the lead, who forces A to trump first, by which means A wins only five tricks.
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