The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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or three days and nights went by ; I reckon I might say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. • Here is the way we put in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there—sometimes a mile and a half wide ; we run nights, and laid up and hid day-times; soon as night was most gone, we stopped navigating and tied up—nearly al­ways in the dead water under a tow-head ; and then cut young cotton-woods and willows and hid the raft with them. Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water
was about knee deep, and watched the daylight come. Not a sound, anywheres —perfectly still—just like the whole world was asleep, only sometimes the bull-frogs a-cluttering, maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line—that was the woods on t'other side—you couldn't make nothing else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness, spreading around ; then the river softened up, away off, and warn't black any more, but gray; you could see little dark spots drifting along, ever so far