The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search

Share page  

Previous Contents Next

sparks was our clock—the first one that showed again meant morning was coming, so we hunted a place to hide and tie up, right away.
One morning about day-break, I found a canoe and crossed over a chute to the main shore—it was only two hundred yards—and paddled about a mile up a crick amongst the cypress woods, to see if I couldn't get some berries. Just as I was passing a place where a kind of a cow-path crossed the crick, here comes a couple of men tearing up the path as tight as they could foot it. I thought
I was a goner, for when-
ever anybody was after any­body I judged it was me—or maybe Jim. I was about to dig out from there in a hurry, but they was pretty close to me then, and sung out and begged me to save their lives—said they hadn't been doing nothing, and was being chased for it—said there was men and dogs a-coming. They wanted to jump right in, but I says—
"Don't you do it. I don't hear the dogs and horses yet; you've got time to crowd through the brush and get up the crick a little ways ; then you take to the water and wade down
to me and get in—that'll throw the dogs off the scent."
They done it, and soon as they was aboard I lit out for our tow-head, and in about five or ten minutes we heard the dogs and the men away off, shouting. We heard them come along towards the crick, but couldn't see them; they