The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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THE TROUBLES OF ROYALTY.
165
'' You ! At your age ! No ! You mean you're the late Charlemagne ; you must be six or seven hundred years old, at the very least."
" Trouble has done it, Bilgewater, trouble has done it; trouble has brung these gray hairs and this premature balditude. Yes, gentlemen, you see before you, in blue jeans and misery, the wan-derm', exiled, trampled-on and suiferin' rightful King of -, , France."                                            /
Well, he cried and took on so, that me and Jim didn't know hardly what to do, we was so sorry—and so glad and proud we'd got him with us, too. So we set in, like we done before with the duke, and tried to comfort him. But he said
it warn't no use, nothing but to be dead and done with it all could do him any good ; though he said it often made him feel easier and better for a while if people treated him according to his rights, and got down on one knee to speak to him, and always called him "Your Majesty," and waited on him first at meals, and didn't set down in his presence till he asked them. So Jim and me set to majestying him, and doing this and that and t'other for him, and standing up till he told us we might set down. This done him heaps of good, and so he got cheerful and comfortable. But the duke kind of soured on him, and didn't look a bit satisfied with the way things was going ; still, the king acted real friendly towards him, and said the duke's great-grandfather and all the other Dukes of Bilgewater was a good deal thought of by his father and was allowed to come to