The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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and his arms stretched away up, and his head tilted back, looking up at the sky; and then he begins to rip and rave and grit his teeth ; and after that, all through his speech he howled, and spread around, and swelled up his chest, and just knocked the spots out of any acting ever / see before. This is the speech— I learned it, easy enough, while he was learning it to the king :
To be, or not to be ; that is the bare bodkin
That makes calamity of so long life ;
For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunsinane,
But that the fear of something after death
Murders the innocent sleep,
Great nature's second course,
And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune
Than fly to others that we know not of.
There's the respect must give us pause :
Wake Duncan with thy knocking ! I would thou couldst;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The law's delay, and the quietus which his pangs might take,
In the dead waste and middle of the night, when churchyards yawn
In customary suits of solemn black,
But that the undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns,
Breathes forth contagion on the world,
And thus the native hue of resolution, like the poor cat i' the adage,
Is sicklied o'er with care,
And all the clouds that lowered o'er our housetops,
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.
'Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished. But soft you, the fair Ophelia ;
Ope not thy ponderous and marble jaws,
But get thee to a nunnery—go !
Well, the old man he liked that speech, and he mighty soon got it so he could do it first rate. It seemed like ne was just born for it; and when he had his hand in and was excited, it was perfectly lovely the way he would rip and tear and rair up behind when he was getting it off.