The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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INTOXICATION IN THE RING.                                     193
that ever was. They argued and tried to keep him out, but he wouldn't listen, and the whole show come to a standstill. Then the people begun to holler at him and make fun of him, and that made him mad, and he begun to rip and tear ; so that stirred up the people, and a lot of men begun to pile down off of the benches and swarm towards the ring, saying, " Knock him down ! throw him out ! " and one or two women begun to scream. So, then, the ring-master he made a little speech, and said he hoped there wouldn't be no disturbance, and if the man would promise he wouldn't make no more trouble, he would let him ride, if he thought he could stay on the horse. So everybody laughed and said all right, and the man got on. The minute he was on, the horse begun to rip and tear and jump and cavort around, with two circus men hanging onto his bridle trying to hold him, and the drunk man hanging onto his neck, and his heels flying in the air every jump, and the whole crowd of people standing up shout­ing and laughing till the tears rolled down. And at last, sure enough, all the circus men could do, the horse broke loose, and away he went like the very nation, round and round the ring, with that sot laying down on him and hang­ing to his neck, with first one leg hanging most to the ground on one side, and then t'other one on t'other side, and the people just crazy. It
warn't funny to me, though ; I was all of a tremble to see his danger. But 13