The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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210                     THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN.
"I'm sorry, sir, but the best we can do is to tell you where he did live yesterday evening."
Sudden as winking, the ornery old cretur went all to smash, and fell up against the man, and put his chin on his shoulder, and cried down his back, and says :
" Alas, alas, our poor brotherógone, and we never got to see him ; oh, it's too, too hard !"
Then he turns around, blubbering, and makes a lot of idiotic signs to the duke on his hands, and blamed if he didn't drop a carpet-bag and bust out a-crying. If they warn't the beatenest lot, them two frauds, that ever I struck.
Well, the men gethered around, and sympathized with them, and said all sorts of kind things to them, and carried their carpet-bags up the hill for them, and let them lean on them and cry, and told the king all about his brother's last moments, and the king he told it all over again on his hands to the duke, and both of them took on about that dead tanner like they'd lost the twelve disciples. Well, if ever I struck anything like it, I'm a nigger. It was enough to make a body ashamed of the human race.