The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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and sobbing a little. There warn't no other sound but the scraping of the feet on the floor, and blowing noses—because people always blows them more at a funeral than they do at other places except church.
When the place was packed full, the undertaker he slid around in his black
gloves with his softy soothering ways, putting on the last touches, and getting people and things all ship­shape and comfortable, and making no more sound than a cat. He never spoke ; he moved people around, he squeezed in late ones, he opened up passage-ways, and done it all with nods, and signs with his hands. Then he took his place over against the wall. He was the softest, glidingest, stealthiest man I ever see ; and there warn't no more smile to him than there is to a ham.
They had borrowed a melodeum—a sick one ; and when everything was ready, a young woman set down and worked it, and it was pretty skreeky and colicky, and everybody joined in and sung, and Peter was the only one that had a good thing, ac­cording to my notion. Then the Reverend Hobson opened up, slow and solemn, and begun to talk ; and straight off the most outrageous row busted out in the cellar a body ever heard; it was only one dog, but he made a most powerful racket, and he kept it up, right along; the parson he had to stand there, over the coffin, and wait—you couldn't hear yourself think. It was right down awkward, and nobody didn't seem to know what to do. But pretty soon they see that long-legged undertaker make a sign to the preacher as much as to say, " Don't you worry—just depend on me." Then he stooped down and begun to glide along the wall, just his shoulders showing over the people's heads. So he glided along, and the pow-wow and racket getting more and more outrageous all the time ; and at last, when he had gone around two sides of the room, he disappears down cellar. Then, in