The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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268
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN".
Jim again. I got down there all out of breath but loaded up with joy, and sung
out—
" Set her loose, Jim, we're all right, now !"
But there warn't no answer, and nobody come out of the wigwam. Jim was gone ! I set up a shout—and then another—and then another one ; and run this way and that in the woods, whooping and screeching ; but it warn't no use—old Jim was gone. Then I set down and cried ; I couldn't help it. But I. couldn't set still long. Pretty soon I went out on the road, trying to think what I better do, and I run across a boy walking, and asked him if he'd seen a strange nigger, dressed so and so, and he says :
"Yes."
" Wherebouts ? " says I.
" Down to Silas Phelps's place, two mile below here. He's a runaway nigger, and they've got him. Was you looking for him ? "
'' You bet I ain't! I run across him in the woods about an hour or two ago, and he said if I hollered he'd cut my livers out—and told me to lay down and stay where I was ; and I done it. Been there ever since ; afeard to come out."
" Well," he says, " you needn't be afeard no more, becuz they've got him. He run off f'm down South, som'ers."
" It's a good job they got him."
"Well, I reckon! There's two hunderd dollars reward on him. It's like picking up money out'n the road."
"Yes, it is—and I could a had it if I'd been big enough ; I see him first. Who nailed him ? "
"It was an old fellow—a stranger—and he sold out his chance in him for forty dollars, becuz he's got to go up the river and can't wait. Think o' that, now ! You bet Pd wait, if it was seven year."
" That's me, every time," says I. " But maybe his chance ain't worth no more than that, if he'll sell it so cheap. Maybe there's something ain't straight about it."
"But it is, though—straight as a string. I see the handbill myself. It tells all about him, to a dot—paints him like a picture, and tells the plantation he's