The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search

Share page  

Previous Contents Next

would be most an hour, yet, till breakfast, so we left, and struck down into the woods ; because Tom said we got to have some light to see how to dig by, and a lantern makes too much, and might get us into trouble ; what we must have was a lot of them rotten chunks that's called fox-fire and just makes a soft kind of a glow when you lay them in a dark place. We fetched an armful and hid it in the weeds, and set down to rest, and Tom says, kind of dissatisfied :
"Blame it, this whole thing is just as easy and awkard as it can be. And so it makes it so rotten difficult to get up a difficult plan. There ain't no watchman to be drugged—now there ought to be a watchman. There ain't even a dog to give a sleeping-mixture to. And there's Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed : why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain. And Uncle Silas he trusts everybody; sends the key to the punkin-headed nigger, and don't send nobody to watch the nigger. Jim could a got out of that window hole before this, only there wouldn't be no use trying to travel