The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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A BEQUEST TO POSTERITY.                                       313
Jim he couldn't see no sense in the most of it, but he allowed we was white folks and knowed better than him ; so he was satisfied, and said he would do it all just as Tom said.
Jim had plenty corn-cob pipes and tobacco ; so we had a right down good sociable time; then we crawled out through the hole, and so home to bed, writh hands that looked like they'd been chawed. Tom was in high spirits. He said it was the best fun he ever had in his life, and the most intellectural; and said if lie only could see his way to it we would keep it up all the rest of our lives and leave Jim to our children to get out; for he believed Jim would come to like it better and better the more he got used to it. He said that in that way it could be strung out to as much as eighty year, and would be the best time on record. And he said it would make us all celebrated that had a hand in it.
In the morning we went out to the wood-pile and chopped up the brass candle­stick into handy sizes, and Tom put them and the pewter spoon in his pocket. Then we went to the nigger cabins, and while I got Nat's notice off, Tom shoved a piece of candlestick into the middle of a corn-pone that was in Jim's pan, and we went along with Nat to see how it would work, and it just worked noble ; when Jim bit into it it most mashed all his teeth out; and there warn't ever any­thing could a worked better. Tom said so himself. Jim he never let on but what it was only just a piece of rock or something like that that's always getting into bread, you know ; but after that he never bit into nothing but what he jabbed his fork into it in three or four places, first.
And whilst we was a standing there in the dimmish light, here comes a couple of the hounds bulging in, from under Jim's bed ; and they kept on piling in till there was eleven of them, and there warn't hardly room in there to get your breath. By jings, we forgot to fasten that lean-to door. The nigger Nat he only just hollered " witches !" once, and keeled over onto the floor amongst the dogs, and begun to groan like he was dying. Tom jerked the door open and flung out a slab of Jim's meat, and the dogs went for it, and in two seconds he was out himself and back again and shut the door, and I knowed he'd fixed the other door too. Then he went to work on the nigger, coaxing him and petting