The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - online book

Complete illustrated version of Mark Twain's classic book.

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THE STRAW DUMMY.
337
" That ain't got nothing to do with it. The thing for us to do, is just to do our duty, and not worry about whether anybody sees us do it or not. Hain't you got no principle at all ? "
"All right, I ain't saying nothing; I'm the servant-girl. Who's Jim's mother?"
"I'm his mother. I'll hook a gown from Aunt Sally."
"Well, then, you'll have to stay in the cabin when me and Jim leaves."
"Not much. I'll stuff Jim's clothes full of straw and lay it on his bed to re­present his mother in dis­guise, and Jim '11 take the nigger woman's gown off of me and wear it, and we'll all evade together. When a pri­soner of style escapes, it's called an evasion. It's al­ways called so when a king escapes, f'rinstance. And the same with a king's son ; it don't make no difference whether he's a natural one or an unnatural one."
So Tom he wrote the nonnamous letter, and I smouched the yaller wencn's
frock, that night, and put it on, and shoved it under the front door, the way Tom
told me to. It said :
Beware. Trouble is brewing. Keep a sharp lookout. Unknown Feiend.
"Next night we stuck a picture which Tom drawed in blood, of a skull and
crossbones, on the front door ; and next night another one of a coffin, on the 22