Traditional Indoor And Outdoor Games - online book

An Illustrated Collection of 320+ Games & Entertainments For Kids of All Ages.

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

CHAPTER IIóGAMES OF THOUGHT, WIT AND MEMORY
Impromptu Games
DRAMATIC ADJECTIVES
O NE of the company leaves the room and the rest agree upon some adjective that may be easily acted. The person who is to do the guessing returns and asks a question of the members of the company in turn or at haphazard.
In making the replies, every one must act in such a manner as to suggest the adjective agreed upon.
For example, the word selected may be "Weary," and each answer is prefaced with a sigh, a drooping of the body, and an evident desire to lean up against some≠thing. Or, the word decided upon may be "Pedantic." The questioner may perhaps ask, "Can you not give me an idea of what it is ?" and gets for reply: " It depends upon what you mean by an 'idea.' Prof. Porter says that Plato defines an idea as ' the archetypal essence of all things, subsumed under one concept.' " Not re≠ceiving much enlightenment, he may ask the next player, "Will you not throw some light upon this subject?" and receives the answer: "You know that there are many kinds of light. There are the actinic
rays-----" He is apt to intercept further display of
learning by turning to some such safe topic as the weather. But even here he may be told of meteorology
59
Previous Contents Next