Little Lord Fauntleroy - illustrated online book

An American boy becomes A British Earl, By Frances Hodgson Burnett

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Ill
C edric's good opinion of the advantages of being an earl increased greatly during the next week. It seemed almost impossible for him to realize that there was scarcely anything he might wish to do which he could not do easily; in fact, I think it may be said that he did not fully realize it at all. But at least he understood, after a few conversations with Mr. Havisham, that he could gratify all his nearest wishes, and he proceeded to gratify them with a simplicity and delight which caused Mr. Havisham much diversion. In the week before they sailed for England he did many curious things. The lawyer long after remembered the morning they went down-town together to pay a visit to Dick, and the after­noon they so amazed the apple-woman of ancient lineage by stop­ping before her stall and telling her she was to have a tent, and a stove, and a shawl, and a sum of money which seemed to her quite wonderful.
" For I have to go to England and be a lord," explained Cedric, sweet-temperedly. "And I should n't like to have your bones on my mind every time it rained. My own bones never hurt, so I think I don't know how painful a person's bones can be, but I 've sympa­thized with you a great deal, and I hope you '11 be better."
" She 's a very good apple-woman," he said to Mr. Havisham, as they walked away, leaving the proprietress of the stall almost gasp­ing for breath, and not at all believing in her great fortune. " Once,
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