THE MONTESSORI METHOD - online book

Scientific Methods As Applied To Child Education In "the Children's Houses"

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214             THE MONTESSORI METHOD
grown people. They almost ceased to breathe. I rose. " Go out quietly, quietly," I said, " walk on the tips of your toes and make no noise." Following them I said, " And yet I still hear some sounds, but she, the baby, walks with me and makes no sound. She goes out silently! " The children smiled. They understood the truth and the jest of my words. I went to the open window, and placed the baby in the arms of the mother who stood watching us.
The little one seemed to have left behind her a subtle charm which enveloped the souls of the children. Indeed, there is in nature nothing more sweet than the silent breath­ing of a new-born babe. There is an indescribable majesty about this human life which in repose and silence gathers strength and newness of life. Compared to this, Words­worth's description of the silent peace of nature seems to lose its force, " What calm, what quiet! The one sound the drip of the suspended oar." The children, too, felt the poetry and beauty in the peaceful silence of a new­born human life.
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