A fantasy novel by George MacDonald

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32                               PIIANTASTES:
bad temper; so we must have them all out, every one; else we shall be reduced to the painful necessity of cutting your claws, and pulling out your eye-teeth. Quiet! Pussy, quiet! "
But with a perfect hurricane of feline curses, the poor animal broke loose, and dashed across the garden and through the hedge, faster than even the fairies could follow. " Never mind, never mind, we shall find her again; and by that time she will have laid in a fresh stock of sparks. Hooray !" And off they set, after some new mischief.
But I will not linger to enlarge on the amus­ing displays of these frolicsome creatures. Their manners and habits are now so well known to the world, having been so often described by eye­witnesses, that it would be only indulging self-conceit, to add my account in full to the rest. I cannot help wishing, however, that my readers could see them for themselves. Especially do I desire that they should see the fairy of the daisy; a little, chubby, round-eyed child, with such innocent trust in his look! Even the most mischievous of the fairies would not tease him, although he did not belong to their set at all, but was quite a little country bumpkin. He wandered about alone, and
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